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August 30, 2006

Comments

Johnny

Hey, great thoughts. I've wondered about this because my (VERY) limited understanding of the faith is only based on friends. I have a friend who's parents of a mixed-religion marriage (which eventually led to problems) but he explained to me that (and pardon my simplistic grasp of your faith) only those children born from Jewish women are considered "true jews". He didn't say this with any feeling. I was shocked until he put it more bluntly, "Cause you never know who the father is, but you definitely know who the mother is."

That always makes me think, when it comes to these little gals being adopted from China into Jewish-American families. Will they never be "true Jews"?

Good post.

John

I heard on NPR's "Speaking of Faith" last Sunday that a rabi once said that Jeduism is not a religeon of belief, but a religion of practice. You are required to keep the holy celebrations, and we hopy you will gain spiritually by doing so, but the emphasis is on the action , not what is in your mind and heart.
It was the christians who reversed that.

Here is the program that I heard:
http://speakingoffaith.publicradio.org/podcast/podcasthelp.shtml

And here is the ad that came up when I went there:
http://www.cowley.org/mm5/merchant.mvc?Screen=PROD&Store_Code=01&Product_Code=2006-17-1561012785

John

I heard on NPR's "Speaking of Faith" last Sunday that a rabbi once said that Judeism is not a religion of belief, but a religion of practice. You are required to keep the holy celebrations, and we hope you will gain spiritually by doing so, but the emphasis is on the action , not what is in your mind and heart.
It was the Christians who reversed that.

Here is the program that I heard:
http://speakingoffaith.publicradio.org/podcast/podcasthelp.shtml

And here is the ad that came up when I went there:
http://www.cowley.org/mm5/merchant.mvc?Screen=PROD&Store_Code=01&Product_Code=2006-17-1561012785

art-sweet

I think - and just my 2 cents - that it is worth it to try and support and stand up for Jewish communities in which all Jews feel comfortable. Why should our synagouges not be welcoming to adopted children? Why should we let the if Israel says boo I'll jump people define Judaism for us? If we leave, we can't make a difference.

I hope that wasn't obnoxious. I say this as a lesbian jew married to an episcopalian woman adopting a baby from Guatemala... so I'm not telling you to do anything I'm not struggling to do myself.

me jew

I belong to a reform congregation with rabbi with three adopted children. I think he feels like he belongs. And many temples I know will provide holiday tickets if you have financial need. The right congregation can certainly make a difference.

Naomi

please know that there are those of us out there who make it work. I am orthodox, raised conservative, adoptive parent of a black daughter through the foster care system. we are in a very adoption friendly, transracial family community, and our bouncing three year old is the mascot of our open, orthodox shul (which is also home to a few mixed marriages and lesbian couples). it can work!

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